A Midwest Regional Railroad of the 1930's - 1940's
Chicago & Illinois Midland Railway


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The Chicago & Illinois Midland Railway was a class 1 railroad in the U.S. state of Illinois, serving Peoria, Springfield and Taylorville. Its primary purpose was originally to serve the farming communities of Central Illinois but, when coal was discovered in Illinois, it became a major carrier for this commodity, coming under the influence of the Commonwealth Edison Company of Chicago. The C&IM operated passenger trains the 87 miles between Peoria and Springfield until before April 1955, and the 28 miles between Auburn and Taylorville until about 1932. In 1996 Genesee and Wyoming bought the company and the name was changed to the Illinois and Midland Railroad. Chicao &<br>Illinois Midland
Chicago &
Illinois Midland
December 24, 1933

History of the Chicago & Illinois Midland Railway
1853 - The Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis Railway began in 1853 as the Illinois River Railroad. Through a series of mergers and expansions the road could boast of a Peoria to St. Louis main line plus a Jacksonville to Centralia segment.
1888-1890 - The villagers of Pawnee built a rail line from their town to the Illinois Central Railroad mainline 15 miles south of Springfield. The railroad was named the Pawnee Railroad and was later extended eastward to Taylorville and a rail connection with what is today the Norfolk Southern Railway.
1905, the Chicago Edison Company (the predecessor of Commonwealth Edison Company, the Chicago electric utility, now part of Exelon Corp) purchased the Pawnee Railroad for the purpose of transporting coal out of the
Central Illinois coal fields for Chicago Edison's coal-fired power plants in Chicago.
1905 - Name changed to Chicago & Illinois Midland Railway, to match the name of the Illinois Midland Coal Company which it served.
1926 - CP&StL, always in a state of receivership, sold off it's Peoria to Springfield, Illinois line to the C&IM, and the C&IM gained trackage rights from the IC to complete it's line now running from Taylorville northwest to Springfield and north to Havana and Peoria.
1920;s - Samuel Insull builds coal transfer facilities at Illinois River at Havana for barge transfer to Chicago.
1931 - The C&IM is running two passenger trains a day the 87 miles between Peoria and Springfield and the 28 miles between Auburn and Taylorville.
1933 - The Auburn-Taylorville line is now freight only.
1955 - By April of 1955 the C&IM was freighht only and route changes around Havana and Sprngfield had reduced the Peoria to Springfield to 84.3 miles.
1960's - Clear Air Act cuts coal shipments to Chicago from Illinois mines.
post 1960 - Power plants along C&IM lines begin to receive Powder River basin coal from Wyoming and Montana and C&IM is back in business.
1980's - Commonwealth Edison now receiving coal shipped directly to Chicago and C&IM is up for sale.
1987 - Group of private investors purchase C&IM.
1996 - Genesee & Wyoming buys C&IM and changes name to Illinois and Midland Railroad.

C&IM tt33

Chicago & Illinois Midland Springfield-Peoria timetable, 87.1 miles,December 24, 1933
(Taylorville to Auburn 28.4 miles, was freight service only)


C&IM tt31
This August 1931 timetable shows the Auburn-Taylorville passenger service still operating. It also shows the connections to other railroads as well as the iIC trackage rights connection from Springfield south to the junction called Cimic on the Auburn-Taylorville line.


C&IM Map
Chicago & Illinois Midland Map


Our Sources
Private Collection of Richard R. Parks(rp)
Wikipedia the free Encyclopedia [web](wik)
Official Guide- Various editions
http://www.railarchive.net/cimbook/page-m03.htm
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Web Page Written and Maintained by Richard Parks
Copyright Richard Parks, Updated March 4, 2011, revised April 24, 2011